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YearSubjectExcerptSource
1920New York Pliskovers, February 1, 1920The Pliskovers at New York had also organized a Relief Office. The Pittsburgh Branch passes a resolution to enter into correspondence with that of New York, and to invite representation of the latter group to a Pittsburgh mass meeting.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1920Pliskovers Unite, February 15, 1920The gathering was held. Many Pliskovers attended. New York was represented by Mr. William ("Wolke") Feldman, Mr. H. Novak ("Herchel der Debilirer"), Mr. Isaac Weiner ("Yitzchock Hershel Krenis"), and Mr. Sherman. The donation for relief made by delegates as well as the Pittsburgh members totaled $139.00. The relief work for the war sufferers was extended to all parts of the country. The Pliskover organizations at New York, Pittsburgh, Chicago, Cleveland, and Erie worked in close collaboration and unified all efforts, in accord with the emergency needs of those post-war days. On several occasions, national conventions were held at Pittsburgh. New York was represented by the delegats mentioned above; Chicago, by Nahum Soloman (Nahum Mechele's); Cleveland, by Abraham Layman (Avrohom Berel dem Krupnik's); and Erie, by Eli Lerner (Eli Yitzchok Hersh).The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1921The Pittsburgh Convention, February 6, 1921The said delegates attended the Pittsburgh convention at the home of Israel Yudel dem Bonder. Mr. Harry Adler was chosen as delegate to Rumania, where he was to act in the interest of Pliskover refugees. Mr. Adler was also instructed to be at Chicago on February 13. H.S. Radin is sent to New York on a relief commission in behalf of refugees in Rumania. The following national officers were elected at the meeting: Nahum Solomon, executive chairman and B. Gropman (New York), national secretary. A resolution was passed to send a consignment of flour for the Passover holidays to Pliskov. Contributions were as follows: Pittsburgh, $100.00; New York, $50.00; Chicago, $50.00. Total, $200.00. Although we have been unstinting in our efforts to alleviate the miserable plight of our European countrymen and they, in turn, have continually acknowledged them, we are nevertheless conscious that errors on our part, whether avoidable or unavoidable, in the transmission or distribution of relief funds, would entail hardships in particular cases. Should such mishaps have occurred, we can only deplore them to this very day.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1922Holidays for Funds, January 3, 1922Report of sick and needy members. Special committee is appointed. Meanwhile, $150.00 of the proceeds of this meeting is forwarded at once. Possessing our own Sefer-Torah, we conduct the holiday services now in one member's home, now in another's. With this additional source of revenue, we are able to increase the relief moneys for our compatriots here and abroad.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1922Pliskover Youth Uninterested, January 8, 1922Our youth takes no interest in the society. Morris Pearl outlines before the meeting various programs of activities designed to captivate our young, and suggests the group's linking itself up, as a branch, with the Jewish National Workers' Alliance.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1922A Chapel for the Cemetery, December, 1922Contract for chapel is officially drawn up, and the question of finances confronts us anew. (Today these difficulties may arouse amusement, but then they were no matter for laughter. In those days, the problem was terribly perplexing, considering that we counted, all in all, 29 members and of these, a dozen only paid dues and attended meetings. It was not at all an enviable situation for those 12 members.) The chapel enterprise put all other activities of the Association into secondary position. The building contract called for $3,500, and after various architectural modifications in the plans during the course of construction, it mounted to over $7,000. It can readily be imagined that for the limited membership with its more limited revenues, the financial burden fell extremely heavy on the group. The situation grew so precarious that the society was on the verge of losing its cemetery, too. No bank or business man would grant a mortgage. However, the intervention of a few devoted old members saved the day. Securing the cooperation of several home-owners and businessmen of good repute in the community to sign the notes of security, the Association finally prevailed upon a bank to make the necessary loan. The Pliskovers had sustained no losses, although it still had on its hands a mortgage. Members, however, absented themselves from meetings, fearing that, ultimately, all further contributions would only swell the liabilities.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1923Calling all Delinquents, September 9, 1923At the meeting, a committee is appointed to call at the homes of all delinquents for payment of back dues. At this period also, the Pliskover Relief Branch brings to a successful conclusion most of its undertakings. The Association believes that having served its purpose -- and a useful one in a time of emergency -- its continued existence now would only make it a supernumerary to the parent organization.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1923Relief Branch Closes, November 4, 1923The official close of the Relief Branch. Secretary Aaron Roth handed over $67.46 to the general treasury. The series of emergency relief activities of which the Pittsburgh Pliskovers may justly be proud are terminated.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1924An Effort to Revitalize, 1924 - 1925A period of relative inactivity sets in for the year 1924 and the beginning of 1925. Six or seven members show up at meetings. To revitalize them, a committee of five -- H.S. Radin, Isaac Roth, Laib Clair, Shalom Gordon, and Sam Katovsky -- is set up and plans are evolved to recapture life and interest for the organization.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1927A Needy Member, January 26, 1927Special meeting to deal with case of a member, sick and in need. Relief program formulated, and committee and special treasurer appointed. Funds already available for this purpose -- $201.00.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1928The Ladies' Auxiliary, March 4, 1928At the meeting, H.S. Radin's resolution is accepted to the effect that the Social Committee should assist the Pliskover women in the establishment of a Ladies' Auxiliary. It is reported that Baruch Clair is sick and at the hospital. As he is not in critical circumstances and therefore not dependent upon sick benefits or any other assistance, members resolve to send him a bouquet of flowers and commission a committee to pay him an official visit in the name of the Association.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1928A New Generation, November 4, 1928The first ice has been broken. H.S. Radin is elected president. He belongs to the new generation. In the past, the old members had looked upon their youth with the condescension of age and the indulgence of superiors. The young were regarded as whipper-snappers or, at best, "Socialist philosophers." Very often, when one of the young bloods would ask for the floor, a loud murmur would pass in the meeting room: "Oich a mensch? And he wants to have a word, too. Well, well, what is the world coming to?" Hence, with the election to the presidency of one from the ranks of the younger element, we repeat, the ice was broken.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1929Disrepair in the Hometown Graveyard, February 3, 1929Letters from Pliskov read before meeting: fence about graveyard in old home-town in state of great disrepair, and there is not a penny for bread, let alone repairs. A sum of money is drawn from the treasury and a committee is appointed to canvass the Landsleit individually for an additional allowance. Baruch Clair, Chaim Verbofsky, and Eli Weiner serve on this committee. At the following meeting, the Committee reports that a sufficient sum of money has been raised. It is forwarded to the following: Chaim Greenberg, Israel Smolar, and Benzion Zodkevetzky, with a letter to each with instructions relative to the distribution of monies.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1929Greetings from New York, September 1, 1929A member is reported sick. He must travel to consult a specialist, but he is without means. The Association comes to his assistance with $40.00. At the same meeting, two Landsfrauen report of their efforts to organize the Ladies' Auxiliary. A committee is appointed to cooperate with them in every possible way to bring this objective about. This meeting is also honored by another guest -- Hershel David, Chaim Yankele's. He brought a message of greetings from our compatriots at New York, expressed great enthusiasm for the activities of our Association, and donated $20 to our treasury.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938