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YearSubjectExcerptSource
1911Constitution revision, February 12, 1911At this meeting, a committee of six was appointed to revise the Constitution, on the assumption that this revision would increase the activities and life of the organization.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1911Frame the charter, March 12, 1911A motion was made to frame the charter. Although it is not on previous record that the charter was obtained, we may presume that it had recently been secured.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1911Disorder in the meeting, May 21, 1911Minutes of this meeting contain a few remarks which the secretary concludes with the statement: "Meeting adjourned in great disorder."The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1911Tight finances, October 12, 1911Motion carried to pay ill members five weeks sick benefits of $15.00. Income, $9.00. Expenses, $5.69. Balance, $3.31. This meeting adjourned in peace.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1911Financial discrepancies, November 5, 1911Two loans of $15.00 each were granted, while the income of this meeting was $8.50. These apparent discrepancies in accounting can best be explained if we contantly keep in mind the weddings and brissen, alluded to above, and always a major source of working funds for the organization. At every meeting, thanks were extended to the members for bringing in these sums of substantial contributions made at simchos.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1912Progress, 1912During the year of 1912, progress is especially exemplified by a bank balance of such magnitude that the treasurer is requested to post bond.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1913Sefer-Torah, November 23, 1913At this meeting a committee was appointed to purchase a Sefer-Torah. After much bickering among the cliques into which the members had separated, a set of scriptural scrolls were finally bought and proudly marched through the streets to the accompaniment of music. The Sefer was installed in a synagogue with the provision that it may be removed by the members when necessary.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1914Finances and Torah, October 1, 1914Business meeting held, at which a member was paid $3.00 sick benefit, and, in addition, granted a loan of $10.00. The balance in the treasury was $2.00 plus $9.50 income at that meeting, making it a total of $11.50. The treasurer was personally requested to advance the deficit from his pocket. Now that the organization owned a Sefer-Torah, particular note should be made that readings were made therefrom on many occasions, especially on holidays, at the homes of Lazar Rubenstein, Eli Weiner, Yudel Rubenstein, Henry Barr, and Sam Gordon. Here again the Verein found a lucrative source of income. Many of the Pliskovers fondly recall the elaborate dinners, especially at Chana-Esthers, who worked so hard to make them a success. Even today, many members ask when a Minyan will be held again at Mrs. Harry Rubenstein's home, still remembering the appetizing dishes she prepared at previous affairs.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1915Conditions in Pliskov, November 7, 1915Letters from Pliskov read before the meeting, describing the plight of their fellow-countrymen who are literally starving abroad and making desperate pleas for aid. Committee appointed to canvass the Landsleit for funds to be sent to their unfortunate brethren overseas. Membership is still small, most of the Landsleit being as yet unaffiliated with the group. Sundry complaints to the effect that the meetings are not interesting enough. New committees are appointed to formulate stimulating programs.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1916Cemetery Purchase Resolution, August 6, 1916A resolution is passed for the purchase of a cemetery. Jacob Rosen, Yudel Rubenstein, Lazar Rubenstein, Eli Weiner, and Morris Rosen are appointed to make investigations for suitable grounds. At the following meeting, all members are requested to contribute $10.00 per capita for burial ground, or to pay that sum in monthly installments, should the member be unable to pay the full amount at once.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1917Cemetery Purchase, February 4, 1917The treasurer reported $725.00 already available for the cemetery purchase, the mortgage being valued at $750.00. Lazar Rubenstein and Morris Rosen made the purchase on their own accounts and subsequently dontaed it to the organization. At the same meeting, the following were appointed to the Cemetery Committee: Jacob Rosen, Eli Weiner, and Shalom Gordon. Thus, the Pliskover Association becomes busier than ever. A fence, water, and a thousand other needs have to be looked to; and new responsibilities have been assumed. During that same year, on January 26, 1917, Raphael ben Shimon, then our oldest Landsmann, had died and he was the first to be laid to rest on our cemetery. All Pliskovers, regardless of their being members or not, paid their last respects to his memory by attending the funeral.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1918The First World War, February 3, 1918Baruch Clair suggests that a campaign be launched for new members. The suggestion is not accepted. He proposes further that the Pliskover Association should go on record as endorsing the Zionist platform for the upbuilding of a Jewish homeland in Eretz Israel, and that each member pledge himself to the extent of a shekel per year. The proposal is unanimously accepted. While the entry of the United States into the World War brought about a period of prosperity and men made money easily and abundantly, others reaped only despair and brokenheartedness. One of our Pliskovers, Abraham, a son of Joseph Maslof, better known as Harry, was among the first American soldiers to fall on the battlefield. Morris Rubenstein, Joe Rosen, and Meyer Rosen have been drafted already, but they are still at camp. Laib Shapiro, Baruch Clair, and Harry Roth are shortly to go there. Meyer Levin also served in the army.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1918Farewell to our soldiers, June 6, 1918The Association passed the resolution to tender a farewell banquet to those of the boys belonging to our group before their departure with the American armies for Europe. Fishel Lenetzky requested to hold the party at his home and the leave-taking took place there on May 5, 1918. Many Pliskovers and their friends appeared at the gathering, the tables were richly served, Senator Marcus delivered a patriotic address, heartfelt farewells were exchanged, and tearful blessings were bestowed upon the boys for their return in good health. Many donations were made at this affair.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1919Purim Fines?, February 3, 1919The Association has great expenditures and stands in need of more funds and cemetery ground. The proposal is accepted for the Megilla to be read at the house of Shalom Gordon, and that all members come, those failing to do so to be fined a dollar.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1919Burning the Mortgage Papers, January 5, 1919A committee was set up to pay off the mortgage. The following members were appointed to serve: Eli Weiner, Shalom Gordon, Yudel Rubenstein, and Morris Rosen. An auction is celebrated on January 15, and to the highest bidder goes the honor of burning the mortgage papers. Samuel Rosen was the lucky destroyer. The war is over, thank G-d, and the boys whom our organization saw off to the front, have returned in good health. There is, of course, rejoicing. But, attendance at meetings has fallen off. They lack interest: again dry figures and the same old demands for funds for the cemetery, a fence, and a chapel.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938
1919The Pliskover Relief Branch, December 11, 1919An unending cry of despair continues to be heard from the war victims abroad, especially during the pogroms following the war. The Association begins a series of discussions concerning the establishment of a Pliskover Relief Branch, although several members are serving already on the general People's Relief Bureau. Indeed, a house-to-house canvass is being made every Sunday in behalf of this Bureau to solicit funds for war victims. Nevertheless, a Pliskover Relief Branch, it is realized, would be far more effective in bringing aid to our stricken countrymen. We hear of some donators who contributed to the People's Relief as little as five dollars when we might have expected a minimum of a hundred dollars. At the meeting, therefore, a resolution is passed to set up the Pliskover Relief Branch. Baruch Clair and Morris Rosen are appointed to insert advertising in "The Forward", and the secretary is instructed to have letters printed requesting all Landsleit to attend a mass meeting.The Thirtieth Anniversary Jubilee Book of The Pliskover Free Loan Association, 1908-1938